A Prayer in Darkness by Gilbert Keith Chesterton

This much, O heaven—if I should brood or rave,
Pity me not; but let the world be fed,
Yea, in my madness if I strike me dead,
Heed you the grass that grows upon my grave.

If I dare snarl between this sun and sod,
Whimper and clamour, give me grace to own,
In sun and rain and fruit in season shown,
The shining silence of the scorn of God.

Thank God the stars are set beyond my power,
If I must travail in a night of wrath,
Thank God my tears will never vex a moth,
Nor any curse of mine cut down a flower.

Men say the sun was darkened: yet I had
Thought it beat brightly, even on—Calvary:
And He that hung upon the Torturing Tree
Heard all the crickets singing, and was glad.

Poet: Gilbert Keith Chesterton
English
1874 – 1936

Gilbert Keith Chesterton was a writer, poet, philosopher, journalist, dramatist, biographer, critic and lay theologian. Referred to as the ‘prince of paradox’ he empowered his points using proverbs, allegories and popular sayings by turning them inside out carefully. He is famed for his fictional detective Father Brown and for the influence of orthodox Christianity in his work. He converted to Catholicism in 1922.

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

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