Your Hay It Is Mow’d, And Your Corn Is Reap’d by John Dryden

Your Hay It Is Mow’d, And Your Corn Is Reap’d

COMUS
Your hay it is mow’d, and your corn is reap’d;
Your barns will be full, and your hovels heap’d:
Come, my boys, come;
Come, my boys, come;
And merrily roar out Harvest Home.

CHORUS
Come, my boys, come;
Come, my boys, come;
And merrily roar out Harvest Home.

MAN
We ha’ cheated the parson, we’ll cheat him agen,
For why should a blockhead ha’ one in ten?
One in ten,
One in ten,
For why should a blockhead ha’ one in ten?

For prating so long like a book-learn’d sot,
Till pudding and dumplin burn to pot,
Burn to pot,
Burn to pot,
Till pudding and dumplin burn to pot.

CHORUS
Burn to pot,
Burn to pot,
Till pudding and dumplin burn to pot.
We’ll toss off our ale till we canno’ stand,
And Hoigh for the honour of Old England:
Old England,
Old England,
And Hoigh for the honour of Old England.

CHORUS
Old England,
Old England,
And Hoigh for the honour of Old England

John Dryden

John Dryden
Born: 9 August 1631, Aldwincle, Northamptonshire, UK
Nationality: English
Died: 12 May 1700, London, UK

Dryden was a poet, literary critic, playwright, and translator. He was appointed the first English Poet Laureate in 1668. Dryden is considered to have dominated literary life in Restoration England to such an extent that in some literary circles the period became known as the Age of Dryden.

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