Don’t Go Far Off by Pablo Neruda

Don’t Go Far Off
1924

Don’t go far off, not even for a day, because —
because — I don’t know how to say it: a day is long
and I will be waiting for you, as in an empty station
when the trains are parked off somewhere else, asleep.

Don’t leave me, even for an hour, because
then the little drops of anguish will all run together,
the smoke that roams looking for a home will drift
into me, choking my lost heart.

Oh, may your silhouette never dissolve on the beach;
may your eyelids never flutter into the empty distance.
Don’t leave me for a second, my dearest,

because in that moment you’ll have gone so far
I’ll wander mazily over all the earth, asking,
Will you come back? Will you leave me here, dying?

Pablo Neruda

Pablo Neruda
Born: 12 July 1904, Parral, Chile
Nationality: Chilean
Died: 23 September 1973, Santiago, Chile

Neruda was a poet-diplomat and politician who became known as a poet at aged 13. He wrote in various styles including surrealist and historical political.

4 thoughts on “Don’t Go Far Off by Pablo Neruda

    1. I have no idea why he did that, although in his time it may have been a nod to communism – but that’s just a guess

      Thank you for reading and commenting

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        1. Quick bit of research gives a fair reason for changing name – but dfoesn’t really solve where he got it from

          Neruda is thought to have derived his pen name from the Czech poet Jan Neruda,] though other sources say the true inspiration was Moravian violinist Wilma Neruda, which name appears in Arthur Conan Doyle’s novel A Study in Scarlet. The young poet’s intention in publishing under a pseudonym was to avoid his father’s disapproval of his poems.

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